Is it worthwhile to perform your electrical work, and how will Part P affect me? What has thus changed?

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Take into account the substantial rise in home electrical equipment over the past 10 to 15 years, including:

Bathrooms: tiled floors, low-voltage lighting, electric showers, and underfloor heating.

Computer systems, DVDs, televisions, and other entertainment systems are now seemingly present in every child’s bedroom.

Hair dryers, hair tongs, and electric blankets in bedrooms.

Dishwashers, dryers, freezers, microwaves, blenders, and sandwich makers are all found in kitchens.

Lawnmowers, hedge trimmers, pond pumps, and lights for gardens.

 

Then, is it any surprise that, on average, poor electrical work performed by eager DIY enthusiasts, “cowboy” electricians, or aging electrical installations results in 10 deaths, 750 serious injuries, and 12,500 fires each year?

 

As a result, with a few minor exceptions, electrical work performed in the home is now governed by Part P of the Building Regulations, which took effect on January 1st, 2005.

 

The local government may require removing or correcting any poor workmanship and a fine of up to £5000.00 if you violate Part P of the Building Regulations. Additionally, it can make it challenging to sell your house in the future.

 

If I do any electrical work, will someone find out? I can confirm that it was completed before January 2005.

 

Since January 2005, the colors of the cable’s cores have changed, making it simple to identify any activity that involves installing wire. Earth remains the same (green/yellow), life is now brown (formerly red), and neutral is now blue (previously black).

 

What does Part P cover?

 

·Dwellings

 

Outbuildings, garages, greenhouses, and sheds.

 

Garden lights and power sources, such as pond pumps

 

Standard amenities in apartment buildings, such as stairways, laundry rooms, etc. but no elevators

 

“Combined business and residential properties with a shared supply” (bars, stores, etc.)

 

How do I adhere to Part P?

 

Suppose you hire a contractor or electrician certified by a self-certifying scheme (belongs to the N.I.C.E.I.C., E.C.A., or another recognized service scheme). In that case, you won’t need to notify the building control officer to comply with Part P.

 

By submitting a form (often done on the “Web”), the authorized contractor or electrician will notify their accreditation service of the notifiable electrical work undertaken. The accrediting agency will then notify the relevant Building Control Officer of all notifiable works carried out in his jurisdiction (often every month), who will subsequently let you know that he has the necessary notification.

 

If the work involves replacing a part or changing a circuit, you must get a Minor Works Certificate from the contractor or electrician.

OR

Suppose the work entails a complete installation, such as in the case of a new construction, a rewiring of an existing electrical system, the addition of a new circuit, or a significant modification, such as replacing a fuse board. In that case, an electrical installation certificate must be obtained.

 

Within one month of the finished work, which is a reasonable amount of time, the certificate must be provided to you. The certificates and data must be kept secure because they might be needed when selling the property or before further work is done.

 

You must notify the building control officer before starting the work if you conclude that you are competent or hire someone qualified based on experience or formal education and do not hire an accredited contractor or electrician. The building control officer will inspect the finished work.

 

Depending on the authority, the Building Control Officer may require an inspection by a licensed contractor or electrician who will provide a Periodic Inspection Report by British Standard 7671 (I.E.E Regulations) and may also need a completed certificate as part of that standard.

 

Of course, there will be a fee for the Building Control Officer to inspect the work, ranging from £50.00 for a minor notifiable job to several hundred pounds for a significant notifiable job, depending on the local authority. Naturally, there will be a fee if the building control officer also insists on having an accredited contractor or electrician check the property and provide a Periodic Inspection Report.

 

The disproportionate fees and likely need for a Periodic Inspection Report are because most building control officers are not qualified to inspect the work and will thus try to stop you from doing it. If you conduct the work yourself and your local government approve it, it is still unclear if it will be approved when it comes time to sell your home.

 

As a result, trying to cut costs on the labor component of the operation is a mistake.

 

If I choose to undertake the work myself, can a licensed electrician or contractor certify it for me, sparing me the trouble and expense of the building control officer?

 

No. A qualified contractor or electrician cannot verify work done by anybody else since he is unable to inspect the full scope of the wiring, particularly in cases concealed within the building’s structure. The only document he can offer is a Periodic Inspection Report, which formally examines the wiring system but excludes a look at the wiring inside the construction of the building, such as beneath floors, etc. No certificate is contained in the Periodic Inspection Report. As a result, it won’t comply with Part P, even if, as mentioned above, some authorities would require one if you do the work yourself.

 

Are you stating that I need to hire or tell someone accredited (government approved) if I wish to replace a broken socket?

 

No, you can swap out already-owned accessories or replace a broken cable with a similar type and size.

 

Whether or whether a piece of labor must be reported depends on its nature and, more significantly, its location. Location is crucial because certain areas, such as restrooms, gardens, and kitchens, may present a greater danger of shock!

 

Examples of what is and is not reportable are provided below. The following list is not all-inclusive, so if the work you need done does not fit into one of the categories listed below, or you have any questions, I strongly advise that you consult a building control officer, a certified contractor, or an electrician.

 

You need to be aware that whether or not a project is notifiable, the Building Regulations apply to all work done.

 

areas inside a kitchen, bathroom, yard, or other particular place

NOTIFIABLE:

A complete replacement or rewiring

installing a new circuit, such as one for a shower, lighting, or outlet sockets

installing a shower and connecting it to an existing source

swapping out a fuse board

Adding a socket outlet to a circuit already in place

incorporating a light source into a current circuit

adding a storage heater to a nearby current point

putting in a supply for a garage, garden shed, or other outbuilding

installing a light fixture or outlet in a garage, outbuilding, or garden shed

Including the pool while installing a backyard pond pump

installing under-floor or ceiling electric heating

installing a generator for electricity

NOT NOTIFIABLE

affixing a stove to an already-existing connecting device

replacing a single circuit’s damaged cable with a new one that has the same type, size, and installation method as the original cable

returning an item that has been broken, such as a light switch or outlet,

changing a light fixture

tying a piece of equipment to an already-existing nearby connecting point

adding a storage heater to a nearby existing point

changing out an immersion heater

Spaces that are not in a kitchen, bathroom, garden, or other particular place

NOTIFIABLE:

A complete replacement or rewiring

installing a new circuit, such as one for a shower, lighting, or outlet

swapping out a fuse board

installing a light fixture or outlet outside

installing a storage heater and connecting it to the circuit

installing under-floor or ceiling electric heating

installing a generator for electricity

NOT NOTIFIABLE

Adding a socket outlet to a circuit already in place

incorporating a light source into an existing circuit

affixing a stove to an already-existing connecting device

replacing a single circuit’s damaged cable with a new one that has the same type, size, and installation method as the original cable

returning an item that has been broken, such as a light switch or outlet,

changing a light fixture

tying a piece of equipment to an already-existing nearby connecting point

adding a storage heater to a nearby existing point

changing out an immersion heater

A reputable and completely licensed electrical installation and portable appliance testing company, Martin Lancaster and Electrical Testing Surveyors Ltd., can offer testing to businesses and organizations across the UK. You may email them at info@electrical-testing.co.uk and visit their website at http://www.electrical-testing.co.uk for more information.

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